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WILLIAM   VOX  HU3EBOLDT,
archaeological studies had rendered It necessary. His
greater journeys^ however, tended to cultivate This love
for art in all directions, except in music, for which
nature had denied him any talent.
Strange that Humboldt should here also greet and
assist the progress of a better time. The art of paint-
ing applied itself, with great success, to emulate the
depth, warmth., and beauty of a Raphael and a Michael
Angelo. The poetic feeling of the German nation was
destined to give at least an Imitation of that great
past. At the same time young sculptors endeavoured
to conceive their representations strictly and purely ia
the spirit of Greek art., and to refrain from every vain
ornamentation. Thus In both arts Germans achieved
what had been denied to the most eminent talents of
Italy and France. This renovation proceeded from a
few. In painting, the first were Asnius Karsten from
Schleswig, with the two "Wiirtemberg artists, Eberhard
"Wacllter and Gottlieb Schick; In plastic art, the Dane-
Thorwaldsen, and the German sculptor Rauch, who
followed close upon Thorwaldsen. When Humboldt
arrived In Rome, ELarstens had unfortunately already
expired, and the surviving veteran Wachter had re-
turned to his native country, but Thorwaldsen had
achieved his first triumphs, Schick had but lately-
arrived and found a congenial sphere here, and the
young Rauch arrived soon afterwards. The first cele-
brated modern works of art were produced in quick
succession; before all,Thorwaldsen's Jason,and Schick^s
Apollo among the Shepherds.
If Humboldt owed a great part of his artistic educa-
tion to his Roman residence, he has richly compen-
sated this gain to the artists in Rome, For it was
more than common hospitality that they enjoyed in
his house. He and his wife advanced art and artiste
with advice and active assistance. They cared for
them when they fell sick, they assisted them, with
funds, so that they might not be forced to give away
their works below their value. They gave large orders,,,
and had great influence in introducing artists and